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Do better

Published: 
Monday, November 6, 2017

Having lost almost everything in recent floods, hundreds of families in various communities across this country are still struggling to dig themselves out of the disaster zones that their homes have become. Many have been doing it on their own, little by little and one day at a time.

Some told the T&T Guardian they’ve been living on next to nothing, pouring whatever income they have into recovery efforts. They haven’t been waiting on the state and it’s a good thing too, because little assistance has been forthcoming.

This newspaper reported yesterday that chairmen of several regional corporations (in separate interviews) said the “situation was compounded by confusion over assistance to victims from the Ministry of Social Development because of the lack of communication with regional corporations.”

This, in short is not just unfortunate, it is unacceptable. As if the ODPM’s missteps weren’t enough, the apparent lethargy in the response from other state agencies is adding insult to injury. Its not just a matter of distributing cheques either, the state must do better in terms of infrastructural review. The hand of nature is one thing, manmade drainage issues are another.

What are we doing differently, to get things right?

What a man has to do...

PNM political leader and Prime Minister Dr Keith Rowley sought to convince the party faithful this weekend that he has a plan and is prepared to do everything necessary to address some critical issues affecting the electorate.

Two years in, with approval ratings taking a serious hit, everything from the state of UTT’s finances to the 2009 engineering report which said the central block of the Port-of-Spain General Hospital should be condemned, was fair game. Dr Rowley is on the offense now, referring to the oppositions Fazal Karim as “farse” for his UTT comments, and saying he is prepared for the country to eat “green banana and salt, dhal and rice” to get things right.

With the quip, “there comes a time when a man has to do what a man has to do, and I’m your man” Dr Rowley’s charming fodder to the PNM Women’s League may not be scoring him the points he is hoping for.

What a man has to do, especially the man in charge of this country, is to start delivering on some of his governments promises.

Times have changed. Political winds have been known to change frequently too.

Finding greener grass

Kenneth Wallace’s story in the Business Guardian was a refreshing account of how the spirit of entrepreneurship can change the course of life. Wallace, who started a landscaping company with all his savings, demonstrates the kind of drive, innovation and determination that this country needs. Wallace could have maintained the status quo, but he chose to take a risk and do something different. There are more like him in this country and we look forward to telling the stories that inspire.